This is a review of a previous run of this production, at the Vault Festival in 2017. We re-publish carefully selected reviews which we believe still offer an informative perspective. Find out more.

All the stage’s a stage, as Holly Morgan might once have said. Seven Crazy Bitches is Morgan's one-woman show – though it's a one-woman show which also has a man in it. Despite the silly title, the concept behind this show is an entertaining whistle-stop tour through the Seven Ages of (Wo)man, the essence of each portrayed for us in the cabaret style of modern song.

We can thank Shakespeare – also a man – for originally listing the seven ages for us, but that's where Holly takes over: she brings the speech up to date and the audience with her, to meet an amusing array of female icons. Each of the ages (the infant, schoolboy, lover, and so on) is matched to one of Holly's glamorous array of wigs and hats, arranged in an arc before her, centre stage.

The tone is made clear at the outset, with a religiously irreverent introduction to the Virgin Mother – Mary herself – bearing her newborn child. Morgan does a good job of setting audience expectations, whilst still keeping back a couple of surprises: there is no doubt that we should buckle in for some raucous feminist comedy. But the lovely thing about this show is that Morgan has a knack of grounding the audience with serious sentiment, while still keeping it light and comedic. It's highly talented work.

The show is described by Morgan herself as "where stand-up and cabaret meet", which pretty much summarises what we get. Morgan has a powerful singing voice and a flair for imitation, coupled with an effective radar for comic timing; the overall combination works well. Her accomplice (the man on the electronic keyboard) does a good job as the foil and as a gap filler, mostly tasked with amusing the audience during quick-change moments.

I admit this is not a show I would have naturally picked out for myself, but I'm very glad to have seen it. There is also an audience participation aspect to the proceedings here and there, injecting a nicely intimate feel. The hour is all too quickly gone; well worth your time and the ticket price.