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Threesome might not be built around the most original idea, but with a fast-moving witty script and some excellent direction, it’s a very entertaining piece of theatre.  Jamie Patterson, writer and director, deserves considerable credit in both roles.

The play delivers exactly what it says in the title. We’re introduced to Sam and Katie (Chris Willoughby and Gemma Rook), childhood sweethearts and now husband-and-wife team, who are seeking a third person to spice up their love lives. Enter the “girl in a red dress”, Lucy (April Pearson), a brash twenty-something who can do just that.

I loved the initial set-up of the story, especially the way the characters eventually appeared on stage. As the evening unfolds, the ménage a trois swap banter and duel with words brilliantly; all the way through, the script features both hilarious one-liners and obvious (but necessary) innuendo.

Willoughby perfectly captured the essence of his character: trying to be so so cool and nonchalant about the idea of sleeping with a younger woman. Sometimes, just one word from him had the audience in stitches, thanks to his faultless comic timing. Rook balanced this brilliantly, with an uneasiness and reluctance that forced her sexual repression to the fore. Her discomfort at the crass brittleness of Lucy is visible, almost tangible.

Pearson, meanwhile, caries the part of the confident, daring and over-sexed third party to the limits – but successfully so. The dialogue is fast and furious, and with pacy interactions, the three actors together create a thoroughly watchable story.

On the downside, I did think that there might have been more mileage in the game of “Truth and Dare”; it ended a little too soon, and I’d have loved the opportunity to see Sam lose some of his feigned coolness.  There was also a predictability about the final scene: it’s just too convenient and clichéd. I really wanted to see some change in Katie by the end of the play, and Sam’s epiphany feels unrealistic, bearing in mind the circumstances before him. The tension and the build-up are beautifully done – but when it comes to it, it’s almost as though the writer had second thoughts.

Nevertheless, I really enjoyed watching this piece of theatre, and I guess it's always good to leave your audiences wanting more. Patterson should be very proud of this debut production – my guess is that we’ll see much more of his work in the future. He certainly proved that, although two's company, three may not always be a crowd.