The Winslow Boy

4 stars

Once again, the Theatre Royal impress with Terence Rattigan’s Winslow Boy. It’s a compelling story of a thirteen year-old cadet, Ronny Winslow, kicked out of naval school for a petty offence, and the Winslow family’s battle to redress the injustice and clear his name. It’s based on a famous case called Archer-Shee v King, and the central theme is: ‘Let right be done.’

Reviewed by Roz Scott on Friday 27 April | Read more

The Engagement

4 stars

The Engagement is a love story with a difference. It’s a new play written by James Alexander Allen, inspired by a true story from Wayne Liversidge. Allen, an emerging screen writer and playwright, collaborated with Liversidge to tell his story as part of the Hove Grown Festival.

The play opens with Gerri waiting for a date, and hastily tidying her sister away. As the two chat, sister Luanne delivers an sense of something inexorable: this is Gerri's eighth date. Will it be any different to the previous seven? Will the man even show up?

Reviewed by Roz Scott on Sunday 8 April | Read more

Quartet

3 stars

Quartet is a humorous play about growing old, and trying to reconcile present infirmity with former glory. It’s set in an elite retirement home for celebrities and begins on the day when Jean Horton, our main star played by Sue Holderness, arrives.

Reviewed by Roz Scott on Thursday 29 March | Read more

Of Mice And Men

4 stars

Based on John Steinbeck’s famed 1937 novella, Of Mice and Men is a period piece about forced migration triggered by drought and poverty in America. Many tenant farmers had to leave their land in the Dust Bowl, and seek work in California. Like migrants today, they were often resented rather than welcomed.

Reviewed by Roz Scott on Thursday 15 March | Read more

Strangers on a Train

3 stars

Strangers on a Train is a psychological thriller about good and evil, morality, guilt and redemption. Two men meet in a railway carriage; one is reading Plato, specifically about a charioteer driving two horses. White and black, good and evil, the creatures battle for control of the horseman’s soul.

Reviewed by Roz Scott on Friday 12 January | Read more

Grease

3 stars

I must have seen the movie Grease a dozen times or more, the first at the tender age of seventeen. And I certainly wasn't alone: as the show started with the live band playing all the familiar numbers, there were instant ripples amongst the audience as people sang along happily to the likes of Summer Loving and Hopelessly Devoted to You.

Reviewed by Tig Land on Friday 15 December | Read more

A Judgement In Stone

4 stars

A Judgement in Stone is a classic detective story: the mystery of who killed the Coverdales, based on Ruth Rendell’s 1970s novel. Simon Brett and Antony Lampard's adaptation makes a compelling psychological drama, brought to life here by the Agatha Christie Theatre Company. I think it’s a great new avenue for the company to explore which will broaden both their scope, reach and appeal.

Reviewed by Roz Scott on Friday 1 December | Read more

How The Other Half Loves

3 stars

How The Other Half Loves is a comic period piece by Alan Ayckbourn, both written and set in the 1960s. It charts three days in the life of three couples, exploring themes of marriage, infidelity and class – as well as motherhood, sadly as an aside.

Reviewed by Roz Scott on Thursday 23 November | Read more

The Kite Runner

4 stars

Khaled Hosseini wrote a book about Afghanistan, which is already a feature film and is now a touring play at Brighton’s Theatre Royal. It’s a story set in 1974, about children losing their innocence and a struggle between good and evil. It’s about power, wealth, hierarchies, saints, villains and illegitimate children. And it’s a heart-breaking, delicate tale – a tale of love, loss, betrayal and brutalisation.

Reviewed by Roz Scott on Friday 17 November | Read more

The Best Man

5 stars

Set in Philadelphia in July 1960, at one of the national political conventions, this is a play about power, corruption and morality. It’s a race between two men who seek their party’s nomination for the American presidency. Both men are flawed; William Russell is promiscuous and his marriage is in trouble, while Jo Cantwell is ruthlessly pragmatic, believing his ends justify the dirtiest of means. Human nature is such that no one is beyond reproach, but as presidential candidates, their private lives become public property – and the outgoing President needs to decide who to support.

Reviewed by Roz Scott on Wednesday 27 September | Read more

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